Category: Tax Marketing QuickTips

Tax Marketing QuickTip #4: Collecting Leads Online

Ultimately, the purpose of all your direct response lead generation marketing is to do exactly that: Generate leads.

There are many different ways to collect those leads. For example, you can direct people to call a phone number, go to a web site, physically show up somewhere, send something via postal mail, send a fax or email, etc.

Before you scoff at the idea of using 24 hour recorded information phone lines or having people fax something to you, you should know that for the right target market, offer, and marketing message, those response mechanisms still work perfectly fine.

During my international travels, I developed a distinct preference for email communication above all else, and thus that’s ultimately where I would drive leads, but it would often take some time before they got into my email pipeline.

Now days, I definitely prefer webinars for many reasons, and I now use them in all my business operations, including being the single point of entry into my world for tax resolution prospects. In other words, all of my direct mail, all of my telemarketing, and all of my online lead generation send people to the same place: A webinar registration page.

Regardless of whether you’re doing webinars, offering free reports, scheduling a “Tax Debt Settlement Analysis”, etc., collecting leads online all require the same technology set.

There are a bazillion different ways to do this, but since this is a Tax Marketing QuickTip, I’m just going to give you the short version, which represents the technology stack that I’m currently using to collect leads:

  1. Namecheap.com for domain names. I currently own over 150 domain names, and the vast majority of them are simply landing pages for collecting leads. I simply use their URL redirect feature to tie the domain name to the landing page.
  2. LeadPages.net
Continue reading Read More

Tax Marketing QuickTip #3: Riches in Niches

You can’t be all things to all people.

Here’s the cliche example: Physicians are regarded as being one of the highest paid occupational groups in America. But who usually earns more: A family practice doctor, or a heart surgeon?

The specialist makes more money.

On October 24, 2010, I flipped my boss the bird and walked out the door (long story — it had been brewing for a while). That’s the day I entered private practice, without a single client.

For the first several months, I took any and every tax resolution case I could find. I was tempted to work the 2011 tax prep season, but I chose not to, because I knew I could make more money if I stuck to my guns and grew my tax resolution clientele. I was a specialist.

Shortly after tax season was over, I was no longer taking any and every case. By late spring 2011, well over half my new tax resolution clients were family owned trucking companies. My fees and revenues continued to increase, because I had become a specialist within a particular niche.

By the end of August 2011, my tax resolution firm had billed over $35,000 in new revenue for the month, and I was working from Sapporo, Japan. Amazing things happen when you specialize and do niche marketing.

What specialization are you known for, that allows you to charge premium fees?

What high-profit niche do you serve, that allows you to command higher prices, even if you do nothing but 1040 return preparation?

Don’t accept just any client that walks in the door. Pick and choose. Position yourself properly, communicate your value proposition through marketing, and dominate a niche.

That’s how you get rich as an EA, CPA, or tax attorney. That’s how you create a lifestyle practiceContinue reading

Read More

Tax Marketing QuickTip #2: Your Website Sucks

Nearly every tax professional has a web site by now.

Unfortunately, 99% of those websites are garbage.

Your website is there to help you communicate the benefit of your services to visitors. In other words, more than anything else, your website is a marketing piece. Any other function of your web site, such as being a client document portal, is completely secondary to it’s primary function as a central component of your marketing presence.

Since this is a Tax Marketing QuickTip, I’m not going to go on a long tirade about what’s wrong with most tax firm websites. Instead, I’m going to give you my top 5 suggestions for what to include on your web site:

  1. Include a lead capture mechanism. Offer some sort of lead response widget in exchange for their contact information.
  2. Have a blog, and update it frequently. You want your website to rank high in Google. The single most important component of this is to have high quality content on your web site that is updated frequently.
  3. Don’t hide. One of the first places most visitors go when they get to a tax firm website is the “About” page. On this page, visitors want to see a human being. That’s YOU. Have a photo, your full name, and a little bit about you. New tax clients are looking to make a human connection, don’t be anonymous and try to hide behind a corporate identity.
  4. Use client testimonials. Testimonials still matter. This is NOT an outdated marketing idea. Ask your clients for testimonials, and stick them online. Visitors WILL respond positively to this.
  5. Connect your social media accounts. You don’t have to be a social media machine, but your web site should be set up to allow visitors to connect with you on the social media platforms that you’re willing
Continue reading Read More