30-Day Tax Firm Challenge: Day 29

Wow, down to the last couple days of this 30 day challenge.

I’ve missed 3 days so far, and I’ve definitely been just under the wire on other days (like today). In fact, today’s is going out after east coast folks have already headed home, so these are probably challenges you’ll work on tomorrow, I would guess. All the better – take advantage of the holiday down time to do some marketing!

 

Online Marketing

Write 5 emails for your autoresponder sequence.
Estimated Time: 2 hours

By now, you should have an email service provider (ESP) set up from a previous challenge.

You have a digital lead magnet that is delivered in the first welcome message.

But what happens after that? Exactly. Let’s fix it.

You want to create a short engagement series that is delivered automatically via email. This is called an autoresponder. Each email should build upon the lead magnet, due to the fact that this is the topic or area of interest they signed up for.

So just continue the conversation. Send email #2 the day after the lead magnet goes out. I then like to do emails every three or four days after that for the first couple weeks. That means, at a minimum, you want 5 emails in your autoresponder sequence.

First, write 5 subject lines. What 5 new things are you going to deliver to your new fans over the course of the coming weeks? Make these 5 things an extension of the lead magnet you already delivered to them.

Then, write each email. Just sit down and type, as if you were doing so to a friend.

Upload to ESP. Set the timing. Done!

 

Offline Marketing

Find local real estate investing and networking marketing seminars and flyer cars in the parking lot.
Estimated Time: 2-3 hours

Real estate investing gurus and network marketing (MLM) companies have been selling their wares through the good ol’ free evening seminar method for decades, and they’re still growing strong.

Anybody looking to get into one of these types of businesses has expressed an interest in being self-employed.

That means they’re about to have new tax challenges.

Find out about such meetings going on around you. Search on MeetUp.com, Craigslist “community” section, and call local hotels and inquire about such meetings they have coming up on their calendar.

If you can, arrange to actually speak at those meetings. Contact the organizers and inquire about doing a 10-20 minute “tax talk” about their new self-employment tax obligations.

Alternatively, find out when the seminars are. Print up flyers. Put them under windshield wipers in the parking lot during the seminar.

Bam. Cheap, guerilla marketing.

 

Practice Management

Join a local business mastermind group.
Estimated Time: 1 hour

Being an entrepreneur is lonely.

You face challenges and stresses that your family, friends, and even many colleagues just don’t understand.

Being surrounded by other people facing similar challenges, that understand what you’re going through, and can help advise you on solutions, can feel like a godsend at times.

This is a mastermind group.

I try to provide a semblance of a mastermind group over the phone for members, but it’s impossible to duplicate the exact experience. As such, I highly encourage all practitioners to join a local mastermind group.

Look on our trusty friends MeetUp.com and Craigslist. You want a legitimately unselfish group, with no agenda. Try to find something organized by somebody that does not providing consulting and training services of any sort. I realize it’s self-serving of me to say that, but it really is better to find a group with no agenda.

Ask around to other business owners in your area for recommendations into a group. If you absolutely can’t find one, then maybe you’re the person that needs to start one.

Mastermind groups can be invaluable to the success of your business, so I highly encourage you to join one and participate regularly.

 

Comments on 30-Day Tax Firm Challenge: Day 29

  1. Stephen Honda says:

    I am an attorney and would like to market my tax resolution business; however I am concerned that many of the suggestions on this site (such as calling those with tax liens) might violate the rules of professional responsibility. Do you have any information on how to do marketing in a way that doesn’t conflict with those rules?

  2. Jassen says:

    We all have to filter marketing strategies through Circular 230, various revenue procedures, extensive FTC regs, state laws, etc. Everything I’ve done — and write about on this site — is filtered through everything *I* have to comply with as an EA. Attorneys have an additional layer of bar rules, and CPAs have an additional layer of Board of Accountancy rules. So yes, you may need to make some slight adjustments here and there, or skip some strategies entirely. So just skip THAT stuff, and apply everything else. The stuff you CAN do vastly exceeds what you possibly can’t do. For example, several of my direct mail pieces to tax liens have been approved directly by state bars in several states after they were submitted for review, with either no changes or very minor alterations.

  3. Was California one of those states?

  4. Jassen Bowman EA says:

    There are dozens of attorneys in California using my marketing materials and methods. I am not aware of any submitting them to the CA bar. Doesn’t mean they haven’t, just means they haven’t told me about it.

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